No One To Turn To (disquiet0274)

…And this house is such a shit hole. I don’t have the energy for it, man. The emotional energy. I just don’t want to be here. I don’t give a fuck…

Broken: “(of a person) having given up all hope; despairing.”

Sound: “sound produced by continuous and regular vibrations, as opposed to noise”

The Assignment: Record a piece of music in the genre called “broken sound.”

More on this 274th weekly Disquiet Junto project — “Broken Sound: Record a piece of music in the genre called ‘broken sound’” — at: disquiet.com/0274/

More on the Disquiet Junto at: disquiet.com/junto/

I Couldn’t Hear It Beep (disquiet0273)

Here is my 109th contribution to the Disquiet Junto:

The Assignment: Make music for a (new! improved!) slow-waking alarm clock.

I still use the same battery-powered Timex Indiglo alarm clock that my then-co-workers back in 1993 gave me when I went from the evening shift to the day shift at the mutual fund company. I haven’t destroyed it yet, even when routine bites hard.

In the past I have wondered about crafting an alarm clock sound. Maybe people do that on their smartphones, but I don’t sleep with my phone.

In typical Rushton fashion, I assembled this out of various bits and remnants: a beat made in Figure, some lower electronic sounds made in Samplr, recordings I made of birds in the morning, the Severe Thunderstorm Warning Sirens…. and a short sample of a processed voicemail that will surely do it’s job when I Couldn’t Hear It Beep.

More on this 273rd weekly Disquiet Junto project — “Alarm Clocked: Make music for a (new! improved!) slow-waking alarm clock” — at:

disquiet.com/0273/

I Couldn’t Hear It Beep – (disquiet0273)

The Assignment: Make music for a (new! improved!) slow-waking alarm clock.

I still use the same battery-powered Timex Indiglo alarm clock that my then-co-workers back in 1993 gave me when I went from the evening shift to the day shift at the mutual fund company. I haven’t destroyed it yet, even when routine bites hard.

In the past I have wondered about crafting an alarm clock sound. Maybe people do that on their smartphones, but I don’t sleep with my phone.

In typical Rushton fashion, I assembled this out of various bits and remnants: a beat made in Figure, some lower electronic sounds made in Samplr, recordings I made of birds in the morning, the Severe Thunderstorm Warning Sirens…. and a short sample of a processed voicemail that will surely do it’s job when I Couldn’t Hear It Beep.

More on this 273rd weekly Disquiet Junto project — “Alarm Clocked: Make music for a (new! improved!) slow-waking alarm clock” — at:

disquiet.com/0273/

A Short Walk Through The Day (disquiet0268)

In 3 minutes I walk through a day: night, morning, the day, a rain storm late in the day, and ending with night. I’m walking on a gravel trail, pitched slightly down. The other sounds you hear were recorded from my screened porch. The music inserted is “A Short Walk Inside” from my 2013 album Crackle And Drift.

More on this 268th weekly Disquiet Junto project, “Walking Music: Take a stroll and describe it in sound, paying tribute to the late manga great Jiro Taniguchi”:

disquiet.com/0268/

More on the Disquiet Junto at:

disquiet.com/junto/

Sit In That Feeling (disquiet0264)

This is a tough one to describe. I knew I couldn’t do time travel with just an instrumental. There had to be a voice involved. Some kind of narrative.

The voice sample (not me) is altered. Pitch-shifted up on the left and lowered on the right, but the duration was preserved on both to avoid phasing. A bit of reverb. The two samples were panned. You should really listen to this piece with headphones.

Was the voice recording cut up and re-ordered or is it a continuous rant?

The subject matter does the time traveling in my mind: Beach Boys, David Lynch movie, minute steaks with sunnyside up eggs, Edgar Winter, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Vyvanse, swinging bachelor pad, dress pants and dress shoes, shaved head, Mannix, Ironside, The White Album, Revolution #9, Long Long Long, Revolution #1, sleep, swagger, “the same feeling that night I drank”, “the shield of armor” (which is Ephesians 6:10-18), AA talk, “and then Laura told me to Sit In That Feeling.”

Book-ending it with talk about “a David Lynch movie” and “Laura told me to sit in that feeling” was intentional. Or was it?

Was I trying to make the voice sound like a cheap version of The Man From Another Place, or did it just turn out that way?

Now you’re thinking about the Twin Peaks reboot. This isn’t about the Twin Peaks reboot. Or is it?

Music added includes bits of “We Meet Again” by Ambient Matyk (to be released soon), “Feather Ridge”, “Kad”, and “Shunting” by me, and some extra sounds.

More on this 264th weekly Disquiet Junto project, Time Travel: Record a piece of music that plays with the perception of time”:

disquiet.com/0264/

More on the Disquiet Junto at:

disquiet.com/junto/

Designer Door Bell (disquiet0253)

Record some welcome music.

Step 1: Ring your own doorbell. Consider how it sounds outside your door, to a visitor, and inside, to you, the inhabitant.

Step 2: Compose a new, personalized doorbell sound. Make a recording of how it might sound to the visitor and to the inhabitant.

*

Annotate your track with a brief explanation of your approach and process:

I really like my house’s door bell, a wireless Heath/Zenith SL-6180-RX-A by Desa International, manufactured in the past decade. The house was built in 1986, but there’s no evidence that it ever had a wired door bell from that era. We live in an “almost rural” setting on a private drive and the houses have more than an acre of hilly woods between them. We never get any kids on Halloween (the nearby main road is quite narrow, no sidewalk, no lights, and the houses spaced far apart) and what few political canvassers we’ve had show up in their car.

Instead of composing something new, I decided to alter the original sound in a way that I normally would. This means pitch shifting it down a bit, adding some reverb, and doing things that bring out the imperfections in the original electronic door bell sound.

More on this 253rd weekly Disquiet Junto project — “Doorbell Rehab: Record some welcome music” — at:

disquiet.com/0253/

More on the Disquiet Junto at:

disquiet.com/junto/

Soothing Baby Sounds (disquiet0250)

“Compose a piece of music intended for a newborn child, something peaceful as they first experience the world outside the womb.”

I remember when our first daughter was born, she would sleep better on car rides when we played music with a touch of prominent bass. Nothing too loud, of course.

This piece tries to replicate that “perfect” soothing baby sound that our daughter liked while in the car. In addition to two kinds of basses, there’s a variety of field recordings mixed in the background, along with a section of the track “Tactile Music” by Mark Rushton and Jon Harnish, from our 2008 album Ornate Culmination.

More on this 250th weekly Disquiet Junto project — “Soothing Sounds for Junto: Make some peaceful music for an infant child” — at:

disquiet.com/0250/

More on the Disquiet Junto at:

disquiet.com/junto/

Morning Music (disquiet0221-morningmusic)

The Assignment: Compose something — quiet, peaceful, refreshing — you’d want to wake up to.

Where I live now, as you can see in the photo, I already get the bird song. It would be nice to swap the old alarm clock for something a little more gentle, like waves of gentle drone sounds like this.

More on this 221st weekly Disquiet Junto project (“Compose something — quiet, peaceful, refreshing — you’d want to wake up to”) at: disquiet.com/0221/

More on the Disquiet Junto at: disquiet.com/junto/

Pajarito (disquiet0139-techtechnique)

Think about a specific technique that you are proud of having developed, perfected, or in some way folded into your work.

Listen to the beginning 80 seconds of my track “Pajarito” which I released in 2008. It was originally created in late 2006.

What technique am I talking about? There’s three things here in Pajarito that make it different from my earlier work and it’s an artistic pivot point for me.

First: If you listen to that low arpeggio – it’s not perfect. It goes out of time. That’s the way I arranged it. I wanted it to be imperfect. Rhythmically, it’s much more interesting to me. It’s repetitive yet shifting because of the imperfection of going out of time.

Second: I’ve always enjoyed pitch-shifting loops down. Something about the lower frequencies connects with me. I got my hearing tested last year, you know, just to check, and the hearing’s fine, but in my right ear I can’t hear higher frequencies. It “drops off” as they say. And now I see why I pitch shift down audio and loops in my work. Every loop that’s multi-tracked on Pajarito is pitch-shifted down an octave, a couple octaves, and even 4 octaves from the original sound.

Third: I incorporated a field recording in the background. If you’re familiar with my work and the track “Machine Symphony” then there you go, that’s the sound. And that is a recording of a faulty air exhaust fan in a bathroom at work about a decade ago, recorded on Minidisc (!), and I pitch shifted it down 4 octaves and it’s still got some high end on it. I’ve used that so many times since then.

So there you. The technique is a blending of 1. Allowing sound to go “out of time”, 2. pitch-shifting lower, and 3. incorporation of field recordings.

More on this 139th Disquiet Junto project — “Create and upload a track that exemplifies one key creative process you’ve developed″ — at: disquiet.com/2014/08/28/disquie…139-techtechnique/

More on the Disquiet Junto at: disquiet.com/junto